Global Hunger Index: Bangladesh ranks 88 among 117 qualifying countries

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

In spite of significant progress, the level of hunger is still “serious”

Bangladesh has ranked 88 out of 117 qualifying countries on the latest Global Hunger Index (GHI) with a score of 25.8. It is a continuation of steady progress over the last decade; the score was 30.3 in 2010. Concern Worldwide and Welthungerhilfe jointly produce the GNI index to track levels of hunger around the world.  

The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is a tool designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger at global, regional, and national levels. GHI scores are calculated each year to assess progress and setbacks in combating hunger. The GHI score incorporates four component indicators: undernourishment, child wasting, child stunting, and child mortality. The indicators included in the GHI formula reflect caloric deficiencies as well as poor nutrition. The undernourishment indicator captures the nutrition situation of the population as a whole, while the indicators specific to children reflect the nutrition status within a particularly vulnerable subset of the population for whom a lack of dietary energy, protein, and/or micronutrients (essential vitamins and minerals) leads to a high risk of illness, poor physical and cognitive development, and death.

Source: Global Hunger Index Website

Although Bangladesh has made significant progress, the level of hunger is still “serious”. The “serious” level of hunger is evidence of poor performance in some key indicators. Over the years, we have made significant progress in reducing under-five mortality and undernourished population, owing to rapid economic development. However, the prevalence of stunting in children under five is well over 35%. The most distressing aspect of the analogy of the index is that “wasting” (low weight for height) has increased to 15% from 11% in 2010. The high levels of stunting and wasting indicate children are particularly vulnerable to nutritional deficiencies and are sensitive to even distribution of food within the household. 

Source: Global Hunger Index Website

In South Asia, Bangladesh remains ahead of India (102) and Pakistan (94). Among other countries in the region, Sri Lanka ranked the highest at 66th, with a score of 17.1, while Afghanistan ranked lowest scoring 33.8. 

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
On Key

Related Posts

MAKING EVERY LIFE COUNT

At a time where the world is faced with the pandemic we now know as COVID-19, people across the globe are gripped with fear for

THE POST PANDEMIC WORLD

To curb the spread of the coronavirus, authorities around the world implemented lockdown measures that have brought much of global economic activity to a halt; many businesses have been forced to reduce operations or shut down, and an increasing number of people are expected to lose their jobs; companies in the services industry, a major source of growth to many economies, were among the hardest hit in the coronavirus pandemic; manufacturers have also been hit, and world trade volume could once again plummet this year.

A RACE FOR THE CURE

The CoronaVirus outbreak worldwide has shed light on the vaccine industry. The fast-growing vaccine industry has become a centre of attention in the global arena.

WEALTH FOR HEALTH

In the time of the pandemic, questions of healthcare coverage and quality of healthcare all over the country have come under scrutiny. One question has been rising continuously if healthcare is seen as valuable as economic growth by the country leaders.